Monday, April 26, 2010

Intraabdominal complications secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunts: CT findings and review of the literature.

Chung JJ, Yu JS, Kim JH, Nam SJ, Kim MJ. (2009) Intraabdominal complications secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunts: CT findings and review of the literature.
AJR American Journal of Roentgenology. 2009 Nov;193(5):1311-7. Review.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the abdominopelvic CT findings of various intraabdominal complications secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunts for hydrocephalus and to review the literature.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The CT images of 70 patients (33 men and 37 women; mean age, 48.5 years) who underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement and abdominopelvic CT because of shunt-related abdominal symptoms were reviewed retrospectively. CT images were analyzed with regard to the location of the shunting catheter tip; site, size, wall, and septa of localized fluid collection; peritoneal thickening; omentomesentery infiltration; abscess; bowel perforation; abdominal wall infiltration; and thickening of the catheter track wall.

RESULTS: The mean period between the last ventriculoperitoneal shunting operation and CT was 11 months (range, 1 week to 115 months), and the mean number of ventriculoperitoneal shunting operations undergone was 1.4 (range, 1-6). A total of 76 ventriculoperitoneal shunting catheters were introduced in 70 patients: 64 patients had a unilateral catheter inserted and six patients had bilateral catheters inserted. Sixteen patients (22.9%) were pathologically diagnosed with ventriculoperitoneal shunt-related complications: 11 cases (15.7%) of shunt infection, six cases (8.6%) of CSF pseudocyst, four cases (5.7%) of abdominal abscess, three cases (4.3%) of infected fluid collection, and one case (1.4%) of bowel perforation. Microorganisms were cultured from the tip of the shunting catheter or peritoneal fluid in 11 patients (15.7%).

CONCLUSION: On abdominopelvic CT, various intraabdominal complications secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunt were shown, of which, shunt infection was the most common, followed by CSF pseudocyst, abscess, and infected fluid collection.

PMID: 19843747