Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Constipation as a reversible cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure. Report of two cases.

Powers CJ, George T, Fuchs HE. Constipation as a reversible cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure. Report of two cases. Journal of Neurosurgery. 2006 Sep;105(3 Suppl):227-30.

Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt failure is a common problem encountered by pediatric neurosurgeons. The majority of such failures are due to obstruction of the device. Conditions in which intraabdominal pressure is chronically elevated, such as pregnancy, have been associated with shunt failure. Chronic constipation may also result in abnormally elevated intraabdominal pressure and may be an underrecognized cause of distal VP shunt failure. The authors describe the cases of two children who presented with clinical and imaging evidence of VP shunt failure and who were also severely constipated. Treatment of their constipation resulted in both clinical and imaging-documented resolution of their shunt failure.

PMID: 16970237

2 comments:

zercath said...

There is no medical reason to have a constipation cause movement every day. Going without a bowel movement for two or three days does not cause physical discomfort, only mental distress for some people.

zercath said...

For many people, it simply means infrequent stools. For others, however, chronic constipation means hard stools, difficulty passing stools (straining), or a sense of incomplete emptying after a bowel movement. The cause of each of these "types" of constipation probably is different, and the approach to each should be tailored to the specific type of constipation.